Wednesday, April 21, 2010

Question #2

How does Wilson use humor? Based on what we've read so far, where and why?

12 comments:

Ashley Moore said...

Based on what we’ve read so far, Wilson uses comedy in his relationships. The way the characters communicate is humorous. For example, when the dialogue first started, Seth and his wife Bertha was looking out in the field at Bynum. Seth was making fun at what he was doing. When they began to talk it was more on the humorous side than the serious side, especially when Bynum started stepping on the vegetables.

T. Moore said...

Based on what I’ve read so far, Wilson uses humor with Bertha’s character. So in the beginning Bertha made biscuits. Throughout any conversation she repeatedly told every character to come get some biscuits; no one moved. Then she just stopped asking people to get them and started passing them out to everyone. Bertha is persistent and I find it so hilarious. (Pg2463)

T. Moore said...
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Alex Micole said...

I somewhat agree with Tara Moore , I dont see any humor within Bertha making biscuit, but I found humor in Bynum being in the field playing with the piegon, along with some of the sayings he has including " the shiny man".

Kevin Bennett said...

Based on what we've' read so far, Wilson uses humor through how the characters characterized one another. This is shown when Seth went on and on talking about Bynum in the work he did outside.

S.Manuel said...

Based on what we've read so far, I believe that Wilson incorporates comedy in his play throug the interaction of his characters and how they express themselves. Seth and Bertha have a close knit relationship because they are married, and you can say alot about their personalities by listening to their conversation. Seth is a funny character and he can be compared to a grandpa who causes alot of ruckus. He was complaining about Bynum being in his yard, and Bynum was not even doing anything wrong. I agree with Ashley Moore, and Tara does an excellent job expanding A. Moore's arguement. I believe that Bertha and Seth's conversation before Byrum came in was extremely hilarious, and i can compare it to a conversation between my grandma and her husband.

Adija Brown said...

I agree with Ashley Moore based on the simple fact that you become aware that his is humerous because of the way that they talk to each other. You can see that this was not a serious moment. Wilson uses humor as he talks to people.

Pier J. Rogers said...

Ashley M. makes a good point about comedy being used to show how close- knit the relationships are between the characters of the play. Often times African American authors use the theme of laughter and comedy to hide a deeper pain that has not yet been revealed in the work. I think this is where the phraseI laugh to keep from crying comes from.

Tierra LaSha said...

I agree with Saferia. Bertha and Seth do have a humurous relationship. It is clear that Seth does all of the complaining and Bertha does all of the listening. It is funny because usually the woman does all of the complaining and the man does all of the listening. Bynum also shows a lot of humor. He is a man with child-like characteristics. Like some children, Bynum stomps around in freshly gromn veggies and plays around with pigeons. Furthermore, humor is in the exchanging of words between Selig and Seth. Selig tries to get Seth to give him the merchandise at a cheaper price, but Seth talks about how cheap Selig's materials are.

Benjamin said...

Wilson uses comedy well as stated above(in relations). The first instance was when the husband and wife where arguing a little and talking about the man chasing pigeons. Then humor is seen when husband argues with the white man for a better price for the metal dustpans.

Raycha Maxwell said...

I think Wilson uses humor so far through Bynum and Seth. Seth doesn't like what Bynum is doing and so he talks to Bertha about it. However, when Bynum comes in, he doesn't say anything directly to him until he makes the comments about the vegetables. However, he doesn't seem so tough to Bynum s he seem to Bertha. I think that's funny because it reminds me of the elderly around my house. They will talk about someone but they won't say what they said to that person.

Jazzy Ford said...

I agree with Adija because based on what we have read so far,the characters show humor when talking to one another. I also agree with P Rogers because authors usually have humor showing pain instead of happiness.